Tag Archives: canada

WHC Federal Duck Stamp Entry

I’m anxiously awaiting to hear how my pintail painting faired this year in the WHC Federal Duck Stamp Competition (Canada). It was a tough one but in the end I’m pleased with how it came together. I’m still learning on how to paint birds. So much intricate details involved!

Fingers crossed…

42430223_936929649849248_3951622473576873984_o.jpg

Stillwater Pennask Rainbow – Commissioned Piece

Since I took up painting, it has been one of the most fun and most challenging pursuits of my art career thus far. The learning curve isn’t quite as steep as I anticipated, mostly because my brain knows how I want something to look, but there’s definitely patience required when learning a new medium. With pencil, I know exactly how to make something look the way I want it. Pencil pressure, smudging techniques, erasers…I have put in thousands of hours with a pencil in my hand. But with brushes and paint, it’s a whole new game altogether! It takes me longer than usual to get things to look the way I want, but I’m getting there.

This was a really fun piece and the finished product is one of my absolute faves! The one huge benefit of paint, is the colours just glow. I incorporate a lot of translucent glaze layers with several thin layers of colour to give incredible depth and vibrancy, something I couldn’t even think to achieve with pencil. These techniques give the piece a 3D look and also change throughout the day and depending on the lighting projected on the piece. This piece is no exception and in proper light, it grabs you and draws you in.

Before I started painting I didn’t see the allure to why people would pay thousands of dollars for an original painting. But now I understand. It’s not just about the painting itself, it’s about the hours the artist invested in front of that piece. The brush strokes, the mistakes, it’s the whole process. And of course, a print doesn’t do the original piece justice at all. You don’t get the colour depth, vibrancy, or any of the effects that paint offers. Prints can be quite flat in comparison. So now I understand why and I’m so happy with how this piece turned out!

This piece was for a friend of mine, Alfred Pryce, who commissioned me to do his favourite fish in his favourite scene. A Pennask Rainbow hovering over a Chara bed, with chironomids emerging around it. For stillwater anglers, this is their Holy Grail and why so many anglers flock to British Columbia’s stillwater lakes. I was able to also add in Alfred’s favourite fly, the Pumpkinhead Leech, which is one of John Kent’s masterfully devised patterns.

Thank you Alfred!

 

“Stillwater Pennask Rainbow” – 20 x 30″ Acrylic on Canvas

Irene and I were able to deliver the piece in person to Alfred. He showed us his incredible house with an amazing view! =)

Spawning Bull Trout and Kokanee

Fall is dominated by hues of orange and red. From the fiery mountain sides to the blue streams dotted with red, fall is a time of death and recreation. As the leaves change, so do the fish and here in the mountains, this means spawning trout and salmon.

Although some species of trout spawn in the spring, Char spawn in the fall. The fluvial populations migrate upstream to their spawning creeks from the lakes they call home. During this feat, bull trout change from their silver non-breeding colours to their vibrant breeding colours. This transformation results in crimson bellies highlighted with white edged fins.

At the same time, Kokanee Salmon too migrate into the creeks to spawn, undergoing a similar transformation. Normally a silver fish, Kokanee transform into vibrant crimson accented with green heads and white lower jaws. Unlike the Bull Trout which return to the lake after spawning, Kokanee Salmon, like all Pacific Salmon species, die after spawning.

At all times of the year, Bull Trout feast on Kokanee Salmon. From creek mouth ambushes on new Kokanee fry, to open water assaults, to gauntlets of hungry mouths as the Kokanee try to travel upstream to spawn, the cat and mouse game is constant. Co-dependant species, the Bull Trout keep the Kokanee numbers in check, while the Kokanee allow the Bulls to get to truly impressive sizes. Sadly, in much of their range, populations are declining due to habitat loss especially in their native spawning creeks, as well as competition from other species that have been introduced.

spawning bull trout and kokanee300.jpg

This piece meant a lot to me, going back to my roots of how I started with fish art. Inspired by such artists as Joseph Tomelleri, Flick Ford, and Paul Vecsei, I loved how detailed and precise their works were. Being detail obsessed myself, I emulated my style after theirs. As years went on, I ventured away from the illustration style, invoking a much more action packed style. Despite my artist evolution, I have always been a huge fan of my idols’ work and this piece signifies that respect for them and their talent.

13344556_10153481766267237_8238993182287850328_n

To this day, after fishing in some of the most incredible waters in Canada for so many amazing native species, I still hold Bull Trout in the highest regard. I have so much respect for these fish and the stunning, pristine waters that they inhabit. Since moving to BC, it has been amazing to be able to chase these piscivores locally and see them in their home waters. There’s nothing more exhilarating having a big bull swipe at your fly seemingly out of nowhere. Their appetite is impressive and there is almost no fly too big to toss for them. I’ll normally use a heavily weighted 8-12″ fly that I’ll swing thru the current.

Being ambush predators, Bulls almost always bite best in the early hours or just as the sun starts going down. Casting at midday is usually futile. Bull Trout will simply hold in a seam and wait for dusk. During these times, a perfectly drifted stonefly nymph may entice them for a midday snack, but typically they won’t even react. I have seen however, these sedentary Bulls spark up when a hooked Cutthroat is struggling on the end of your line. Like a shark smelling blood in the water, you can see the body language instantly change and watch them go into hunting mode.

Here in Golden, BC, September marks the Kokanee Salmon spawning migration, and one of the best times of the year to fish for Bull Trout. As the bright red little salmon begin their migration, the Bull Trout gorge on the hordes of easy meals. At this time of year, Bull Trout can get to blimp status as they stuff themselves with as many little salmon as they can.

12144791_442499002625651_5446736282476640880_n

ReelFlies Brook Trout

I am very fortunate to have gotten to know some fantastic people in the fishing industry and the Bathgate family of ReelFlies are some of the best people around! I fully support Canadian businesses and especially those who support keeping things made in Canada. Unlike many other businesses that offer fishing flies, ReelFlies uses only Canadian tyers and the highest quality materials and hooks! I have so much respect for Steve and his family and when they asked if I’d be interested in doing up something for them I was honoured! I wanted to do something up special and really try to give them my best.

I decided on a Brook Trout which is not only one of my favourites but is also one of the mainstay target species for many of the ReelFlies’ following. This is to date my most detailed piece I’ve ever done and is 100% digitally drawn. The detail isn’t really shown unless you zoom in and see all the scale and fin detailing.

Thank you Steve, Ceri, Hayley, and the rest of the family. =)

Please check out their website and visit them on Facebook!
http://www.reelflies.ca/
https://www.facebook.com/reelflies.ca

Reelflies Brookie Nick Laferriere

Steelhead Dreams

The latest fine art piece I put together. After I completed the Rainbow Trout piece for the Stamp Competition I received a lot of hype and interest from people wanting to purchase prints. Unfortunately I had to sign a contract stating that if I won all rights were to be owned by Manitoba Fisheries. So as to not disappoint too many people, I decided to do up a steelhead piece in similar manner.

I tried a few new things with this piece. For one, I wanted to reach out from the confines of a rectangular border. I achieved this by having different aspects coming out of the traditional frame.

Along the way there’s always obstacles and things I would change for next time. It’s always a new learning experience with every piece I do.

Steelhead DreamsOriginal Artwork by Nick Laferriere
Watercolour Pencils

Gaggle of Goose Skulls

Lame title I know. lol. This project showcases the four most popular geese available to us in North America. Specklebelly (White-Fronted) Goose, Greater Canada Goose, Snow Goose, and Lesser Canada Goose.

For those who are obsessed with goose hunting, they understand what it’s like to setup their spread in the wee hours of the morning. Trudging across a field, setting up their decoys, brushing their blinds, in hopes of a good shoot. When everything works out as planned, it’s hard to beat a great morning in the field. Whether you’re sky-busting snows or getting covered up by big Canadas, goose hunting gets the heart pumping. It’s a great way to bond with your comrades and do some team calling.

TAKE EM!

Specklebelly, Greater Canada, Snow, and Lesser Canada Original pencil artwork by Nick Laferriere

Specklebelly, Greater Canada, Snow, and Lesser Canada
Original pencil artwork by Nick Laferriere