Tag Archives: acrylic

WHC Federal Duck Stamp Entry

I’m anxiously awaiting to hear how my pintail painting faired this year in the WHC Federal Duck Stamp Competition (Canada). It was a tough one but in the end I’m pleased with how it came together. I’m still learning on how to paint birds. So much intricate details involved!

Fingers crossed…

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Wave Riders – Walleye Painting

I’ve been fortunate to have witnessed some truly incredible moments while guiding and fishing for walleye throughout my life. Some of the most memorable events are when the wind is blowing, creating wind-induced currents. Fish were stacked up along windswept shorelines and points, capitalizing on baitfish getting tossed around in the waves, making for easy pickings. They also aren’t shy from airborne predators because of the surface agitation, giving them cover from aerial attacks, and will be feeding in very shallow water. This is the inspiration behind this piece, to try to encapsulate the action onto canvas.

Planning out this piece was a fun process, creating balance with the wave action and the sand bottom, complimented by a pair of hunting walleye and a school of baitfish getting tossed about. I wanted to make the piece vibrant with contrasting blue water elements, sand bottom and the gold of the walleye.

Wave Riders Walleye Painting

Snatch ‘n’ Grab – Pike Painting

My next piece is already underway, journeying into the underwater world of Esox. Depicting one of the most celebrated times for pike anglers, the post spawn, when pike put the feed bag back on to try to recover from the arduous task of passing the torch to the next generation of water wolves.

Fuelled by hundreds of hours chasing pike and the unforgettable memories witnessing pike hit the afterburners to grab their target, this piece aims to stop time and appreciate the tremendous power and force these fish impose on their targets. As burst predators relying heavily on ambush, pike are notorious for spending a great deal of time, when the water is still cold, in shallow, weedy environments where their camouflage and patience often rewards them.

Snatch n grab pike

Work in progress, featuring a post spawn water wolf taking advantage of the high waters of spring to snatch a meal.

This was a heck of a challenge to complete and I’m really happy with how it came together. I had a very vague image in my mind of how I wanted it to turn out and put a lot of faith in the process. The vision for the piece continually evolved the more I worked on it and slowly took shape. Throughout the process, I took the painting off the easel and looked at in a mirror and stood back to see how it balanced. I wanted to take the viewer into the pike’s world and give an “in your face” experience.

Having the lighting coming from the back of the subjects, made for an interesting challenge. I had to think outside the box and create the illusion with lighting showing through the fins and having the shadows cast towards the viewer. The effect was challenging but I think adds a unique element to the piece. We’re used to seeing paintings and photos with front or side lighting, so pulling this effect off took a bit of extra thinking.

And lastly, adding the finishing details was one of my most fun parts of the piece. I added little swirls of blood coming from where the pike’s teeth are penetrating the sucker, pearlescent scale highlights on the pike, and I hid a perch in the lower right of the painting as well.

All in all, I had a lot of fun with this one and I’m glad the journey is over. =P I’m finding the more paintings I work on, the moment when I put the brushes down is a great moment. It’s closure on weeks of being absorbed into a painting.

Snatch n Grab Pike Painting

Finished Pike Painting

“Arctic Assault” Lake Trout/Grayling Painting

Currently working on an acrylic piece, bringing a big dinosaur Lake Trout to life! I’ve had this idea for quite some time and I’m enjoying the challenge! Lakers make for a challenging subject due to the amount of detail and number of spots!

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Lake Trout acrylic painting in progress

After a game-time line change, I decided to add a grayling instead of a lure. The results couldn’t have turned out better and I’m happy to announce the completion of this piece.

Laker Grayling Painting

Done with acrylics on birch board, this 18 x 24″ painting took roughly a month to complete from concept to completion.

Giclee prints will be available soon and the original painting is available for purchase as well. Please contact me for pricing.

We Tyee Three

After all the compliments and much love I got from the walleye and lake trout pieces that I did in this style, I wanted to pay homage to one of the most iconic gamefish in North America. From the Great Lakes to the West Coast, and even down in New Zealand and Argentina, the Chinook or aptly crown King Salmon! Chrome bullets made of solid muscle and built for the open ocean, these masters of the sea attract anglers from all over in search of the greatest salmon honour, the legendary Tyee! A 30lb+ King!

“We Tyee Three”
19×24″ Acrylic on Birch

we tyee three

Now available on EP!C Arthouse branded shirts!
https://www.epicarthouse.com/collections

Stillwater Pennask Rainbow – Commissioned Piece

Since I took up painting, it has been one of the most fun and most challenging pursuits of my art career thus far. The learning curve isn’t quite as steep as I anticipated, mostly because my brain knows how I want something to look, but there’s definitely patience required when learning a new medium. With pencil, I know exactly how to make something look the way I want it. Pencil pressure, smudging techniques, erasers…I have put in thousands of hours with a pencil in my hand. But with brushes and paint, it’s a whole new game altogether! It takes me longer than usual to get things to look the way I want, but I’m getting there.

This was a really fun piece and the finished product is one of my absolute faves! The one huge benefit of paint, is the colours just glow. I incorporate a lot of translucent glaze layers with several thin layers of colour to give incredible depth and vibrancy, something I couldn’t even think to achieve with pencil. These techniques give the piece a 3D look and also change throughout the day and depending on the lighting projected on the piece. This piece is no exception and in proper light, it grabs you and draws you in.

Before I started painting I didn’t see the allure to why people would pay thousands of dollars for an original painting. But now I understand. It’s not just about the painting itself, it’s about the hours the artist invested in front of that piece. The brush strokes, the mistakes, it’s the whole process. And of course, a print doesn’t do the original piece justice at all. You don’t get the colour depth, vibrancy, or any of the effects that paint offers. Prints can be quite flat in comparison. So now I understand why and I’m so happy with how this piece turned out!

This piece was for a friend of mine, Alfred Pryce, who commissioned me to do his favourite fish in his favourite scene. A Pennask Rainbow hovering over a Chara bed, with chironomids emerging around it. For stillwater anglers, this is their Holy Grail and why so many anglers flock to British Columbia’s stillwater lakes. I was able to also add in Alfred’s favourite fly, the Pumpkinhead Leech, which is one of John Kent’s masterfully devised patterns.

Thank you Alfred!

 

“Stillwater Pennask Rainbow” – 20 x 30″ Acrylic on Canvas

Irene and I were able to deliver the piece in person to Alfred. He showed us his incredible house with an amazing view! =)

“Passing the Torch” Award Winning

I got the news right after the judging that my piece was chosen to represent the Pacific Salmon Foundation and will be featured on the 2017 BC Saltwater Fishing licenses! It’s hard to comprehend that I won on my first time entering, but I guess I brought a fresh new style to the competition.

A visual tale of the fragile circle of life of Pacific Sockeye Salmon. Their entire lives are destined for this moment in time, to pass on their genes to the next generation.┬áThe astonishing journey they take is nothing short of epic. They easily could cop out and spawn closer to the sea, but they seemingly take an impossible route to get back to their spawning grounds. Truly one of nature’s spectacles.

Salmon are one of the most important fish in the west. They feed many different species and bring nutrients to rivers that wouldn’t otherwise be capable of sustaining life. Bears, wolves, and eagles, also carry salmon carcasses away from the rivers which provide nutrients for trees and plant life surrounding the rivers. They truly are incredible animals, and that’s why organization like the Pacific Salmon Foundation are so important to help bring awareness of the status of our salmon species and to take action to help restore their spawning areas.

This 19.5 x 27″ piece took over 100 hours to complete. I chose to use acrylics on native BC douglas fir board to render this idea into a reality.

I got the news right after the judging that my piece was chosen to represent the Pacific Salmon Foundation and will be featured on the 2017 BC Saltwater Fishing licenses! It’s hard to comprehend that I won on my first time entering, but I guess I brought a fresh new style to the competition.

Passing of the Torch final small.JPG

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2017-2018 Salmon Conservation Stamps!